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Hawthorn

Crataegus oxyxantha | herb info from the Happy Herb Company

Botanical name:

Crataegus oxyxantha

Hawthorn is truly a superstar when it comes to heart and the cardiovascular system. Millions of people can benefit from the medicinal effects of this herb, including people who suffer from high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, angina and heart arrhythmia.

Scary fact that cardiovascular disease is the number 1 killer in Australia and several other countries, so hawthorn is a crucial treatment when it comes to herbal prevention for your heart.

This herb improves oxygenation, and thus has an immediate, beneficial impact on energy levels as well as improving blood flow through the coronary arteries. It reduces the likelihood of angina attacks and relieves symptoms of angina (chest pain or discomfort that occurs when an area of your heart muscle doesn’t get enough oxygen-rich blood) when they occur.

Recommended on a daily basis for anyone over the age of 50 as a preventative measure against heart disease. It causes no toxicity and is safe for long term use in the elderly.

 

Not convinced yet?

Isabelle Shippard states in her book ‘How can I use herbs in my daily life’ that controlled studies showed that when taken for a period of 6 months, this herb could have a gentle effect, dilating arteries, bringing down high blood pressure, and allowing a better flow of oxygen-rich blood to the lungs, brain, and every cell of the body.

While hawthorn berries are the most often used part of this shrub, the flowers and leaves play an important role too. A very pleasant tea may be made from infusing 1-2 teaspoons of the dried herb in a cup of hot water. This should be drunk regularly.

Precautions / Contraindications

Remember to always ask your treating doctor before you attempt to take any herbs in case it doesn’t mesh well.

References

Shippard, I (2003) How can I use herbs in my daily life. Queensland: Stewart
Stengler, M (2001) The Natural Physician’s Healing Therapies. Prentice Hall Press

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